Securing Environmental Water: Mill Creek flows

Stream flow is critical to sustaining riverine plants and animals, many of which have adapted to historic flow patterns. These species include the foothill yellow-legged frog, whose reproduction is timed with the annual spring snowmelt, and Pacific salmon that migrate up the Sacramento and spawn in the creek. Mill Creek, a tributary of the Sacramento River, hosts one of the highest elevation salmon-spawning habitats in California and is one of the few streams that still support threatened spring-run Chinook salmon.

Preliminary Optimization for Spring-Run Chinook Salmon Environmental Flows in Lassen Foothill Watersheds

Stream flow controls physical and ecological processes in rivers that support freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity vital for services that humans depend on. This master variable has been impaired by human activities like dam operations, water diversions, and flood control infrastructure....

A Method to Consider Whether Dams Mitigate Climate Change Effects on Stream Temperatures

This article provides a method for examining mesoscale water quality objectives downstream of dams with anticipated climate change using a multimodel approach. Coldwater habitat for species such as trout and salmon has been reduced by water regulation, dam building, and land use change that...

Objective classification of Navarro River salmon habitat: a watershed‐based critical habitat case study

  1. Prevailing freshwater conservation approaches in the USA stem from policy-based ecosystem management directives, science-based gap analyses, and legal interpretations of critical habitats. In California, there has been no systematic prioritization of freshwater habitats critical to the

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Detecting Patterns of Land Use Disturbance at a Watershed Scale: A Study of the Navarro River Watershed using Hyperspectral Data Analysis Techniques

Analysis of hyperspectral data is a particularly novel approach to investigation of the relation between anthropogenic and natural disturbances, geomorphic responses, and ecosystem patterns at the watershed scale. During July 2000, hyperspectral imagery was collected for the Navarro basin (...

Mass Wasting Identification in the Navarro River Watershed Using Hyperspectral Imagery

Several of northern California's coastal watersheds have been listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as requiring the development of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for non-point source pollution. One such case is the Navarro River watershed located in southern Mendocino County....

A Multi-Proxy Approach to Examining Land-Use Change Effects on Steelhead Trout and Coho Salmon in NW California

Historically, juvenile and spawning adult steelhead trout and coho salmon were found in abundance in the Navarro Basin of NW California. However, the numbers of juvenile steelhead and spawning adults have declined greatly over the past 100 years, while coho salmon rearing and spawning is now...

Homogenization of California’s Fish Fauna Through Abiotic Change

The decline of native fish populations and the invasion of non-native fishes are the most noticeable trends in California's freshwater fish assemblages over the last century (Moyle and Williams 1990, Moyle 2000). Moyle (2000) and Dill and Cordone (1997) date the first introduction of non-native...

Nonpoint Source Pollution Modeling in the North Coast of California

The Navarro River watershed hosts one of the last extant populations of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in the Central California Evolutionarily Significant Unit. As such, the identification and restoration of riparian habitats in the Navarro River watershed is paramount to the continued...

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