Biotic homogenization of the California flora in urban and urbanizing regions

Biotic homogenization, driven by native species losses and invasive species gains was investigated for the flora of California. Data from a variety of available databases were aggregated at the county level to examine patterns in county population density and growth in relation to floristic...

Anthropogenic impacts upon plant species richness and net primary productivity in California

We assess the importance of anthropogenic land-use, altered productivity, and species invasions for observed productivity–richness relationships in California. To this end, we model net primary productivity (NPP) c. 1750 AD and at present (1982–1999) and map native and exotic vascular...

Geodatabase application for invasive plant tracking and coordinated habitat restoration

Non-native invasive plants, such as Lepidium latifolium and Arundo donax, threaten
the ecological integrity of riparian habitat throughout California. Numerous projects
across the state are underway to eradicate select weeds, yet there is little or no
monitoring of parameters that...

Fish invasions in California watersheds: testing hypotheses using landscape patterns

An important goal of invasion biology is to identify physical and environmental characteristics that may make a region particularly receptive to invasions. The inland waters of California (USA) are highly invaded, particularly by fishes, although there is wide variation in numbers of nonnative...

Homogenization of California’s Fish Fauna Through Abiotic Change

The decline of native fish populations and the invasion of non-native fishes are the most noticeable trends in California's freshwater fish assemblages over the last century (Moyle and Williams 1990, Moyle 2000). Moyle (2000) and Dill and Cordone (1997) date the first introduction of non-native...

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