Cosumnes Research Group

The Cosumnes River is the only free-flowing river on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, and because of its natural flow regime it has become the centerpiece for decades-long research on the benefit of floodplain reconnection for the purposes of ecological restoration and preservation of ecosystem services, such as local groundwater recharge, flood wave attenuation, and temporal spawning habitat for native fishes, such as splittail, and rearing habitat for juvenile anadromous salmonids, such as chinook salmon.

Identification of invasive vegetation using hyperspectral remote sensing in the California Delta ecosystem

Estuaries are among the most invaded ecosystems on the planet. Such invasions have led in part, to the formation of a massive $1 billion restoration effort in California's Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta. However, invasions of weeds into riparian, floodplain, and aquatic habitats threaten the...

Perennial pepperweed invasion on a restored seasonal floodplain

The science of restoration ecology emphasizes the importance of managing, and often manipulating, both physical and biotic factors to facilitate ecosystem recovery. Among many other factors, our investigation of successful riparian floodplain restoration has focused on the positive impact of...

Productivity alters the scale dependence of the diversity-invasibility relationship

At small scales, areas with high native diversity are often resistant to invasion, while at large scales, areas with more native species harbor more exotic species, suggesting that different processes control the relationship between native and exotic species diversity at different spatial...

Human Impacts, Plant Invasion, and Imperiled Plant Species in California

Invasive species are one of the fastest growing conservation problems. These species homogenize the world's flora and fauna, threaten rare and endemic species, and impose large economic costs. Here, we examine the distribution of 834 of the more than 1000 exotic plant taxa that have become...

Perennial Pepperweed Infestation on the Cosumnes River Experimental Floodplain A Report to the California Bay-Delta Authority

Riparian floodplains present a unique challenge for restoration management, in that these are, by definition, dynamic, constantly changing ecosystems. As restoration projects are initiated and progress through time, both native and invasive species can become established. During the initial...

Invasion in a Diversity Hotspot: Exotic Cover and Native Richness in the Californian Serpentine Flora

Exotic species have been observed to be more prevalent in sites where the richness of native species is highest, possibly reflecting variation among sites in resources, propagule supply, heterogeneity, or disturbance. However, such a pattern leaves unclear whether natives at species-rich sites...

CalJep: A Spatial Distribution Database of CalFlora and Jepson Plant Species

CalJep is a spatially enabled database that reconciles or cross-walks the two prominent electronic plant distribution lists for California: CalFlora and Jepson. We intersected the distribution information from the two data sources to create a refined spatial distribution repository that can be...

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