Modern departures in fire severity and area vary by forest type, Sierra Nevada and southern Cascades, California, USA

Acute changes in ecological disturbance regimes can have major consequences for ecosystems and biota, including humans, living within them. Human suppression of fire in the western United States over the last century has caused notable changes to many ecosystems, especially in lower elevation,...

Using Topography to Meet Wildlife and Fuels Treatment Objectives in Fire-Suppressed Landscapes

Past forest management practices, fire suppression, and climate change are increasing the need to actively manage California Sierra Nevada forests for multiple environmental amenities. Here we present a relatively low-cost, repeatable method for spatially parsing the landscape to help the U.S....

The fire frequency-severity relationship and the legacy of fire suppression in California forests

Fire is one of the most important natural disturbance processes in the western United States and ecosystems differ markedly with respect to their ecological and evolutionary relationships with fire. Reference fire regimes in forested ecosystems can be categorized along a gradient ranging from “...

Subscribe to RSS - forest fire